Japanese American Internment Memorial, San Jose, 1990-1994


Created 1987-1988

“For those who don’t want to talk about it, well, this will talk for them.” — Fred Korematsu, American Civil Rights Activist

Japanese American Internment Memorial. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

This side depicts the Japanese American community prior to Internment. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Immigrants from Japan came by ship through Angel Island. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

The Asawa farm and home, with shoes left outside. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

FBI agents arrest Asawa's father, Umakichi, three months after Pearl Harbor. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Asawa's father builds the bonfire to burn their Japanese treasures. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Moving from homes to camps, to further inland camps on trains. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

The crowded camps, guard tower and the 442nd regiment of Japanese American soldiers. Photo by James Jue.
Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Children draw, paint, and play in the Internment camps. Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Ruth and her granddaughter Emma, 1996. Photo by Laurence Cuneo. Photo and Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Fred Korematsu's long battle to receive Redress from the US Supreme Court and government for the Internment.
Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Fred Korematsu's long battle to receive Redress from the US Supreme Court and government for the Internment.
Photo by James Jue. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Nancy Thompson, Asawa and son Paul seated in front of the dough panel depicting life after Internment. Photo by Terry Schmitt

Nancy Thompson, Asawa and son Paul seated in front of the dough panel depicting life after Internment. Photo by Terry Schmitt. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

Installing the memorial at the Federal Plaza by a crane, 1994. Artwork © 2021 RAL, Inc.

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